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Catalan independence would have huge repercussions for Spain. But will it actually come about? This story will run, but to start off, here’s a short guide to what’s happening.

Sports fans around the world will be familiar with banners hung from the terraces at Catalan sporting events, declaring that “Catalonia is not Spain”.  The hope for many Catalans is that this wish will soon turn into reality. On 27th September elections were held in Catalonia to choose the autonomous government – but with a twist.   Dubbing it a ‘plebiscite’, parties supporting the right to self-rule joined together in one electoral list, known as Junts pel si (Together for Yes), and with a simple premise: if they won a majority of seats, they would formally declare the start of a unilateral independence process. It didn’t work out exactly as they had hoped.   Junts pel si ended up with 62 seats, 6 short of the 68 needed for an overall majority.  But another fierce supporter of independence, the CUP (Popular Unity Candidacy) – a far-left  anti-system and anti-capitalist party which had stayed out of the Junts pel si list, won a further 10 seats.  Count those in, and pro-independence groups have a sufficient majority in parliamentary seats to push ahead with the plan. Yet a month on from the vote, Catalans are still waiting for a Government to be formed.  The CUP and the former president Artur Mas, head of the centre-right Convergencia party and the promotor of the plebiscite formula, make unnatural bedfellows.   The CUP initially refused to back Mas or anyone from Convergencia as President of the new Government, and publicly at least haven’t shifted from that view. The original road map announced by Mas envisaged the declaration of the start of the process once a new Government...